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SOLARIS centre

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About the SOLARIS Centre

SOLARIS is a Polish national research centre providing scientists with synchrotron radiation.

Synchrotron radiation (also called synchrotron light) is produced in a synchrotron, and then directed to beamlines with experimental end-stations. Beamlines modify the synchrotron light in such a way that it best serves scientists and their measurements. The SOLARIS synchrotron will begin operation with two beamlines (PEEM/XAS with two end-stations, and UARPES with one end-station). Ultimately, however, the experimental hall of the Kraków accelerator will house dozens of them. In total, the beamlines will be fitted with about twenty end-stations.

Synchrotrons allow us to look into the depths of matter itself, and carry out precise analyses. Thanks to synchrotrons, scientists study not only the composition of a given substance, but also its structure – the light of the synchrotron can penetrate into the studied material. It can reproduce hidden layers or fragments of them with any level of detail, without damaging the surface layers. Synchrotron radiation also stimulates processes taking
place in the material, and can bring about changes in the studied material.

Synchrotrons open up completely new research possibilities. Thanks to them, we can carry out analyses which were previously impossible. Synchrotrons also allow us to obtain better results than those from studies carried out using traditional methods. The synchrotron beamlines are currently the most versatile research tools possessed in the natural and technical sciences, such as biology, chemistry, physics, materials engineering, nanotechnology, medicine, pharmacology, geology, or crystallography.

The National Centre for Synchrotron Radiation functions under the auspices of the Jagiellonian University. It is located on the Campus of the 600th Anniversary of the Jagiellonian University Revival, in the southern part of Kraków. It neighbours the Kraków Technology Park special economic zone. The Centre was built between 2011 and 2014. The investment was co-financed by the European Union with funds from the European Regional Development Fund, as part of the Innovative Economy Operational Programme for 2007-2013.

The excellent parameters of the SOLARIS synchrotron put it in the forefront of this type of devices in the world.